Obsessive compulsive disorder - OCD treatment and therapy from NOCD

81 Statistics on therapy and mental health treatment in 2024

Jul 03, 202414 minute read

Key Takeaways:

  • People with OCD who underwent ERP therapy with NOCD saw a 47.8% reduction in anxiety, a 44.2% reduction in depression, a 37.3% reduction in stress, and a 22.7% improvement in quality of life. (NOCD + JMIR)
  • Roughly 50 million Americans experienced a mental health disorder in 2022. (Mental Health America
  • 55.8 million Americans received counseling or mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  • More than half of adults with a mental illness receive no treatment. (Mental Health America

The importance of mental health treatment has never been more pronounced than in 2024. With mental illness recognition on the rise, so is the necessity of addressing mental health concerns and making professional support more accessible.

These 81 therapy statistics shed light on the prevalence of various mental health disorders, the effectiveness of treatment, and the demographics of those seeking care. 

Prevalence of mental health disorders

Close to 50 million Americans experienced a mental health disorder in 2022. The prevalence of mental health disorders is revealed in the following statistics: 

  1. Almost 20% of adults in the U.S. experienced a mental illness in 2022. (Mental Health America)
  2. Both mental illness in general and serious mental illness (SMI) were highest among young women aged 18-25 in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  3. 1 in 6 adolescents between the ages of six and 17 experience a mental health disorder each year. (JAMA Network)
  4. Six percent (or 15.4 million) of adults over the age of 18 had an SMI in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  5. Of those, 11.6% of adults with SMI were 18 to 25 years old. This age range saw the highest occurrence of SMI among adults. (SAMHSA)
  6. The second-highest age range of adults with SMI was aged 26 to 49. (SAMHSA)
  7. Three percent of adults with SMI were aged 50 or older, totaling 3.5 million people. (SAMHSA
  8. In 2022, 6.5% of white adults experienced SMI, 5.3% of Hispanic adults, 4.7% of black adults, 4.1% of Asian adults, and 3.5% of Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander adults. Multiracial adults were most likely to have had SMI in the last year, at 11.8%. (SAMHSA)
Three illustrations accompany three therapy statistics on the prevalence of mental health disorders.

Suicide

Unfortunately, suicide is one of the leading causes of death in America, impacting all age ranges, from young adolescents to older adults, as the statistics below show. 

  1. Across the U.S., the rate of adults who experience suicidal ideation has increased each year since 2011. (Mental Health America
  2. Thirteen percent of adolescents (or 3.4 million) aged 12 to 17 had serious thoughts of suicide in 2022. (SAMHSA
  3. For adults, 5.2% (or 13.2 million) had serious thoughts of suicide in 2022. (SAMHSA
  4. Suicide was the 11th leading cause of death across all ages in the U.S. in 2021. (CDC)
  5. In 2021, suicide was 2nd leading cause of death among adolescents aged 10–14. (CDC)
  6. Suicide was the 3rd leading cause of death among ages 15–24 and the 2nd leading cause of death among adults aged 25–34 in 2021. (CDC)

Substance use disorder 

Substance use statistics underscore the link between addiction and mental health. The statistics below reflect the prevalence of substance use disorders. 

  1. Seventeen percent of people over the age of 12 (or 48.7 million) had a substance use disorder (SUD) in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  2. Of those, 29.5 million had an alcohol use disorder, and 27.2 million had a drug use disorder. (SAMHSA)
  3. Eight million people had both an alcohol use disorder and a drug use disorder in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  4. Alcohol was the most commonly abused substance among women aged 12 and older in 2022, seen across 46.2% of women (or 66.4 million). (SAMHSA)
  5. Following alcohol, the most commonly abused substances among women aged 12 and older were tobacco products (13.7%), marijuana (13%), and nicotine vaping (7.4%). (SAMHSA)
  6. Among female alcohol users in 2022, over 40% were binge alcohol users. (SAMHSA)
  7. Still, more men were binge drinkers compared to women (24.3% of men vs. 19.2% of women) in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  8. More men (18.9%) than women (14.3%) used illicit drugs in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  9. Women were less likely than men to have a substance use disorder in 2022. (SAMHSA)

OCD

OCD is both highly common and incredibly misunderstood. OCD can manifest across people of all ages and may present itself in a variety of different forms and subtypes.

  1. OCD is the fourth most common mental disorder. (ScienceDirect)
  2. Three percent of people with OCD were preschool children aged between 2 and 3 years old. (NCBI)
  3. Twenty-five percent of people saw the onset of OCD before the age of 14. (NIH)
  4. For people with OCD, 45.1% experienced the disorder before the age of 18. (NIH)
  5. Seventy-three percent of people saw the onset of OCD before the age of 25. (NIH)

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Depression

Depression is a widespread disorder both on its own and as a comorbid disorder seen in conjunction with other diagnoses. With major depressive disorder on the rise, prioritizing early intervention will be critical looking ahead. 

  1. As of 2024, the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) is increasing annually. (NCBI
  2. Twenty percent of adolescents (or 4.8 million) between ages 12 and 17 had a major depressive episode (MDE) in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  3. Among young adolescents (aged 12–17), females were more likely to have an MDE compared to males in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  4. Fifteen percent of those had an MDE with severe impairment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  5. Of people with OCD, 84.7% also had a lifetime prevalence of depressive disorders, with 43.8% having major depression. (NCBI)

Anxiety

Anxiety proves to be a pervasive and often debilitating condition affecting millions worldwide. These statistics shed light on the prevalence of how common anxiety disorders are. 

  1. Thirty-eight percent of people saw the onset of anxiety or fear-related disorders before the age of 14. (NIH)
  2. Of people with anxiety or fear-related disorders, 51.8% experienced the disorder occurring before the age of 18. (NIH)
  3. Seventy-three percent of people saw the onset of anxiety or fear-related disorders before the age of 25. (NIH)

Therapy statistics: demographics of mental health treatment 

The number of people seeking mental health treatment has risen in recent years: In 2019, just 19.2% of adults received some form of mental health treatment, but 27% of women and 16% of men received mental health treatment in 2022. This trend is significant as it reflects that more people are prioritizing mental well-being and seeking professional help when needed. 

That said, there are still many who go without treatment, and it’s essential to acknowledge that stigma around mental health still exists, highlighting the ongoing need for continued education and advocacy to ensure that everyone feels comfortable seeking and receiving mental health treatment.

  1. Fifty-six percent of adults with a mental illness receive no treatment. (Mental Health America
  2. In 2022, 26.7% of 18–25-year-olds and 24.5% of 26–49-year-olds received mental health treatment, compared to just 18% of adults aged 50+. (SAMHSA)
  3. Roughly 27% of women received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  4. Roughly 16% of men received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)

Age

Age tends to play a role in the likelihood of seeking and receiving mental health treatment. While mental health issues can affect individuals of all ages, statistics indicate that older adults (aged 50 and above) are notably less likely than young adults to receive treatment.

  1.  Thirty percent of adolescents (or 7.7 million) aged 12 to 17 received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  2. Of 7.7 million children with a mental health disorder, around half didn’t receive the treatment they needed in 2019. (JAMA Network)
  3. Of the 4.8 million adolescents with an MDE in 2022, 56.8% of them received mental health treatment. (SAMHSA)
  4. Forty percent of adolescents with an MDE in 2022 did not receive mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  5. In 2022, 21.8% of adults (or 55.8 million) received mental health treatment. (SAMHSA)
  6. Fifty-one percent of adults (or 30 million) with any mental illness received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  7. Sixty-seven percent of adults (or 10.2 million) with SMI received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  8. Older adults (aged 50+) were less likely than younger adults (aged 18–49) to receive mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)

Gender

While the number of men receiving mental health treatment is on the rise, statistics show that women are more inclined to seek and receive treatment compared to men, reflecting a complex interplay of societal expectations, cultural norms, and individual perceptions of mental health. 

  1. Twenty-six percent more women received mental health treatment in 2022 compared to 2021, increasing from 21.4% to 27%. (SAMHSA)
  2. Compared to 2021, 34.71% more men received mental health treatment in 2022, increasing from 12.1% to 16.3%. (SAMHSA)
  3. The number of men who receive mental health treatment has steadily increased by a whopping 87.36% over the last two decades, increasing from 8.7% in 2002. (SAMHSA)
  4. Nearly all women with a substance use disorder who did not receive mental health treatment did not think they needed treatment. (SAMHSA)
  5.  A mere 1% of women with a substance use disorder sought mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  6. Among young women aged 12–17 who had an MDE in 2022, 2 in 5 did not receive mental health treatment. (SAMHSA)
  7. Among young adolescents (aged 12–17) in 2022, women with an MDE were more likely to receive mental health treatment than males. (SAMHSA)
  8. Among people aged 18 and older, women were more likely to have received mental health treatment than men in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  9. Three in 5 women, or 71.4%, aged 18 and older with SMI received mental health treatment in 2022. (SAMHSA)
  10. Among women older than 12 with a substance use disorder, 84.8% did not receive mental health treatment in 2022, compared to 15.2% who did. (SAMHSA)
  11. Among women older than 18 with any mental illness, 43.1% did not receive mental health treatment in 2022, while 56.9% did. (SAMHSA)
  12. Among women older than 18 with an SMI, the majority (71.4%) received mental health treatment in 2022, while 28.6% did not. (SAMHSA)
  13. Sixty-eight percent of women older than 18 who had a co-occurring substance use disorder and other mental illness sought mental health treatment in 2022, while 32.3% did not. (SAMHSA)
An illustrated bar chart displays a breakdown of recipients of mental health treatment by age.

Therapy success rate statistics 

Understanding therapy success rates is crucial in understanding what factors contribute to positive treatment outcomes. Factors such as the quality of the therapist-client relationship, the appropriateness of treatment modalities, and the consistency of therapy sessions play crucial roles in determining individuals’ satisfaction and treatment success. 

  1. In the treatment of OCD, nonadherence affects between 31% and 65% of people. (NCBI)
  2. In ERP therapy for OCD, NOCD members who received and engaged with peer support interventions from NOCD Member Advocates who had previously completed treatment completed significantly more therapy hours within their first 60 days. (Frontiers + NOCD)
  3. NOCD members in ERP treatment who engaged with peer support from NOCD Member Advocates saw a significant 2.41-point reduction in Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DOCS) outcomes. (Frontiers + NOCD
  4. Peer-delivered support and interventions improved self-reported outcomes in severe mental illnesses. (Psychiatry Online)
  5. For those with schizophrenia and other chronic mental illnesses, peer-delivered support and interventions improved medication adherence. (Psychiatry Online)
  6. Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) is the most effective psychotherapeutic treatment for OCD. (ScienceDirect)
  7. Around 2 in 3 people benefit from ERP therapy via live teletherapy. (NOCD + JMIR)
  8. OCD symptoms were reduced by 43.4% on average for OCD people who underwent ERP via live teletherapy twice per week, followed by six weeks of weekly check-ins. (NOCD + JMIR)
  9. Those with OCD who underwent ERP therapy saw a 47.8% reduction in anxiety, a 44.2% reduction in depression, a 37.3% reduction in stress, and a 22.7% improvement in quality of life. (NOCD + JMIR)
  10. Among OCD people who received remote ERP treatment via videoconferencing twice weekly, 30% no longer met diagnosis criteria for OCD, and 80% of people were rated as very much or much improved after a three-month follow-up. (ScienceDirect
  11. For posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), trauma-focused treatments significantly improved anger in 2024. (NCBI)

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Technology and therapy statistics 

The landscape of mental health care has seen a significant transformation as a result of technology-driven therapeutic interventions, or virtual therapy. Statistics show that videoconference-based therapy and teletherapy represent viable alternatives to traditional talk therapy or face-to-face treatment. They also offer a more cost-effective solution for many, making mental health care more accessible to those who need it. 

  1. In a virtual therapy setting, clinically significant treatment outcomes were achieved in less than half the time traditional, in-person ERP therapy typically requires. (NOCD + JMIR)
  2. In 2020, experiences with remote therapy—both web- and phone-based—were more positive for psychotherapists than expected. (NCBI)
  3. Compared to in-person treatment, psychotherapists rated web-based treatment more positively than phone-based treatment. (NCBI)
  4. People with OCD who received remote ERP treatment via videoconferencing twice weekly saw significant improvements in OCD symptoms. (ScienceDirect)
  5. Video-based psychotherapy was found to be just as effective as in-person treatment in terms of treatment adherence to and satisfaction with treatment. (NCBI)
  6. In a virtual therapy setting, talk therapy saw individuals report comparable satisfaction scores to in-person talk therapy, with both demonstrating very high satisfaction. (ScienceDirect)
  7. Digital peer support interventions are effective in improving the lives of those with severe mental illness. (NCBI)
Three statistics on the efficacy of teletherapy

How to get mental health treatment 

In light of rising rates of mental health disorders, making therapy and treatment more accessible is more important than ever. If you struggle with OCD, working with a trained therapist who specializes in ERP is a great place to start. Learn more about NOCD’s accessible, evidence-based approach to treatment to see if it’s right for you. 

Methodology

Our data methodology for OCD subtype analysis involved gathering self-reported selections from nearly 300,000 NOCD community members. Participants chose from a list of subtypes upon joining, with selections de-identified for anonymity. 

These subtypes are not formal clinical or diagnostic categories but serve to foster a sense of connection and understanding within the OCD community. As one of our clinical leaders, Dr. Nicholas Farrell, highlights, recognizing these subtypes can help individuals realize they are not alone in their struggles.

For our methodology for peer support intervention analysis, participants diagnosed with OCD and receiving video teletherapy ERP treatment were paired with peers who had successfully completed similar treatment. 

Data on treatment adherence rates, participant demographics, and outcomes of the peer support intervention were retrospectively collected from clinical records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, with potential inferential analyses employed to assess differences in adherence rates between participants who received peer support and those who did not. 

Sourcing

NCBI (2020) “Digital Peer Support Mental Health Interventions for People With a Lived Experience of a Serious Mental Illness: Systematic Review.” (Accessed March 2024)

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