Obsessive compulsive disorder - OCD treatment and therapy from NOCD
OCD therapist Taylor Newendorp, Network Clinical Training Director, Licensed OCD Therapist

Taylor Newendorp

Network Clinical Training Director

About

It's essential to see a therapist that truly understands OCD. In addition to working for an OCD-based program in Chicago for the last 10 years, I have ERP training with the International OCD Foundation (IOCDF) and currently train therapists at NOCD. Once you're able to learn how to reduce and stop engaging in compulsive activities, you'll learn how to tolerate anxiety, distress, discomfort better and even reduce the experience of obsessions and intrusive thoughts. I don't have OCD, but I do have intrusive thoughts. When you work with me, you'll find a non-judgemental space to speak freely in. I accept you as who you are and realize that you are not your OCD. Is it possible to get better? Even as disruptive as OCD can be, you can get better. I'm here to help you obtain a better quality of life.

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I want to help you learn methods through ERP ... so you can go on to live a really meaningful, satisfying, fulfilling life.

Taylor Newendorp, M.A., LCPC, has specialized in the treatment of OCD since 2011.


He is the Network Clinical Training Director for NOCD, where he has also served as both a Regional Clinical Director and Clinical Training Specialist. Taylor is the founder of Chicago Counseling Center and is a former clinical supervisor for The Center for Anxiety and OCD at AMITA Behavioral Health Hospital in Illinois. Taylor has completed the IOCDF’s Behavioral Therapy Training Institute and is a member of OCD Midwest.

Publications

  • The Perfectionism Workbook:

    Proven Strategies to End Procrastination, Accept Yourself, 
and Achieve Your Goals.

    Newendorp, T. (2018)

NOCD therapists are trained by our world-renowned clinical leadership team.

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Insurance Coverages

  • United Healthcare / Optum
  • Humana
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Independence Blue Cross (IBC)

States

Illinois

What our members say about
Taylor Newendorp

B.M.

May 12, 2023

Taylor is the best therapist I have ever had. He challenges me improve myself and asks me questions that help keep me honest

B.M.

Mar 03, 2023

Taylor is the best therapist I’ve ever worked with

B.M.

Feb 21, 2023

Taylor was great to talk to. He made me feel very comfortable and open during the session. I cannot wait to continue to collaborate with him on a solution/treatment

Posts from Taylor Newendorp

Recent activity
Taylor Newendorp

Taylor Newendorp almost 4 years

How can someone get their anxiety down enough to do exposures without medication? . . . There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this, but therapists will often work with their clients to design exposures that are achievable before gradually ramping up the intensity. Exposures themselves actually increase anxiety before it decreases over time. But if someone is already so anxious that they can’t begin to do exposures, they may want to consider revising their treatment plan with their therapist (or starting to work with an OCD therapist if they haven’t already). Working with an OCD therapist can help you better understand the long-term benefits of facing your fears through systematic exposures. It will also provide added motivation to endure the increased anxiety that initially comes when you are actively resisting your compulsions.

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Taylor Newendorp

Taylor Newendorp almost 4 years

How do I stop reacting to my thoughts? I feel helpless because I have a constant need to reassure myself. . . . I realize that your thoughts can be so overwhelming that you would do anything to stop them. The cycle of obsession-anxiety-reassurance is exhausting and can pull us away from the things we truly care about. Remember though that these thoughts are just your OCD and aren’t a reflection of who you are. But reassurance-seeking is a compulsion, and there are ways to unlearn our compulsive behaviors. One strategy is “doing nothing.” Don’t even take a moment to acknowledge the thought (or feeling or sensation) has occurred, and simply persist through the activity you’re in. Ignoring thoughts is similar to one of the main goals of OCD treatment: becoming able to experience thoughts without reacting to them. But, in and of itself, it’s a very difficult thing to do; and if it comes in the form of avoidance, it might be counterproductive. Similarly, you could take the exposure-based approach of purposely thinking the thought and “welcoming” the thought while resolving not to check. If you’ve worked with an OCD therapist, you might be familiar with the concept of exposure and response prevention (ERP). This means you’re not using any compulsions when you feel anxiety kicking in. Developing strategies for response prevention takes time, and there are no simple answers. Although ERP is the most effective type of therapy for OCD, it can’t work without the response prevention part. If we’re not preventing ourselves from temporarily escaping anxiety, we can’t learn how to do anything else. In general, once they’ve designed some response prevention strategies together, therapists may ask their clients to deliberately intensify their anxiety when they’re in specific situations and it kicks in. Making an exposure out of these difficult situations can help us be more deliberate in our responses and grow from the moment of anxiety, rather than just suffering through it or spending time and energy on compulsions. So, again, working with an OCD therapist is the best way to learn how to create exposures and respond to anxiety without falling back into the same old compulsive cycle.

Go to post
Taylor Newendorp

Taylor Newendorp almost 4 years

How do I stop reacting to my thoughts? I feel helpless because I have a constant need to reassure myself. . . . I realize that your thoughts can be so overwhelming that you would do anything to stop them. The cycle of obsession-anxiety-reassurance is exhausting and can pull us away from the things we truly care about. Remember though that these thoughts are just your OCD and aren’t a reflection of who you are. But reassurance-seeking is a compulsion, and there are ways to unlearn our compulsive behaviors. One strategy is “doing nothing.” Don’t even take a moment to acknowledge the thought (or feeling or sensation) has occurred, and simply persist through the activity you’re in. Ignoring thoughts is similar to one of the main goals of OCD treatment: becoming able to experience thoughts without reacting to them. But, in and of itself, it’s a very difficult thing to do; and if it comes in the form of avoidance, it might be counterproductive. Similarly, you could take the exposure-based approach of purposely thinking the thought and “welcoming” the thought while resolving not to check. If you’ve worked with an OCD therapist, you might be familiar with the concept of exposure and response prevention (ERP). This means you’re not using any compulsions when you feel anxiety kicking in. Developing strategies for response prevention takes time, and there are no simple answers. Although ERP is the most effective type of therapy for OCD, it can’t work without the response prevention part. If we’re not preventing ourselves from temporarily escaping anxiety, we can’t learn how to do anything else. In general, once they’ve designed some response prevention strategies together, therapists may ask their clients to deliberately intensify their anxiety when they’re in specific situations and it kicks in. Making an exposure out of these difficult situations can help us be more deliberate in our responses and grow from the moment of anxiety, rather than just suffering through it or spending time and energy on compulsions. So, again, working with an OCD therapist is the best way to learn how to create exposures and respond to anxiety without falling back into the same old compulsive cycle.

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Badges and training

Specialties

These designations signify the therapist's expertise in treating specific mental health conditions, ensuring you receive the personalized care you deserve.

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